Lego NS omC

” data-image-caption=”” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/thelegocarblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/53482368205_0509b80625-e1706123582919.jpeg?fit=499%2C310&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/thelegocarblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/53482368205_0509b80625-e1706123582919.jpeg?fit=499%2C310&ssl=1″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-48571″ alt=”” width=”499″ height=”310″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/thelegocarblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/53482368205_0509b80625-e1706123582919.jpeg?w=499&ssl=1 499w, https://i0.wp.com/thelegocarblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/53482368205_0509b80625-e1706123582919.jpeg?resize=150%2C93&ssl=1 150w” sizes=”(max-width: 499px) 100vw, 499px” data-recalc-dims=”1″>

No, it’s an NS omC! OK, that’s maybe not as catchy as the famous Superman musical lyrics, but we have at least learned something here at The Lego Car Blog, having had no idea what an ‘omC’ was before today.

What it is, is an ‘Oilmotor Vehicle’, a combustion-engined carriage used by the Dutch Railways during the 1920s as a cheaper, easier-to-run alternative to steam locomotives.

This one – being a ‘C’ designation – is for third-class passengers, which is where you’d probably find TLCB staff. There were ‘BC’ versions too, where first-class passengers such as The Brothers Brick’s Contributors could luxuriate away from the peasants.

Constructed by TLCB debutant Malik Geldermans, this 1:45th scale replica of the NS omC beautifully captures the real ‘Oilmotor Vehicle’ thanks to some truly fantastic building techniques.

Presented perfectly, there’s more of Malik’s model to see at his ‘NS omC’ album, and you can take a closer look on Flickr via the link in the text above.