Lego Citroen DS

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Citroen, makers of a dreary line-up of unimaginatively titled crossovers, were once something rather more. In fact it could be said that Citroen were once the most innovative car company in the world.

This is Citroen’s innovation zenith; the astounding DS, with front-wheel-drive, self-levelling hydraulic suspension, cornering headlights, in-board disc brakes, and even a clutch-less gearbox, all in 1955.

Produced for two decades the DS was still ahead of the industry when it was replaced in 1975, and this lovely Speed Champions recreation of an early ’70s example comes from previous bloggee SFH_Bricks. There’s more to see on Flickr where a link to building instructions can also be found, and you can take a look at Citroen’s finest moment via the link above.